Get Belted | Ultima 2-Inch Old School Belt Drive

Tech Swap

Get Belted | Ultima 2-Inch Old School Belt Drive - Hot Bike Magazine

01. Here are some of the main components of the Ultima Old School 2-inch Belt Drive we got for a ’91 Softail. Shown are the motor plate (A), motor pulley cap (B), pressure plate (C), and starter gear cover (D). We also picked up one of Ultima’s optional heel guards (E) to help keep our boots and pants from getting chewed up. MSRP for the heel guard is $62.75.

01. Here are some of the main components of the Ultima Old School 2-inch Belt Drive we got for a ’91 Softail. Shown are the motor plate (A), motor pulley cap (B), pressure plate (C), and starter gear cover (D). We also picked up one of Ultima’s optional heel guards (E) to help keep our boots and pants from getting chewed up. MSRP for the heel guard is $62.75.

02. The only issue we found with the Old School Belt Drive was that it isn’t offered in black, so we sent some of the components out to get covered in black powerdercoat to match some of the other parts on the bike. (Note: the bearing and snap ring that came pre-installed in the motor plate were removed before powdercoat, then re-installed before assembly).

03. Kazoo started the install by draining the primary fluid, then removing the outer primary cover bolts.

04. With the outer primary cover removed, Kazoo then loosened the primary chain tensioner.

05. Next, he began removing the clutch hub snap ring, followed by the clutch hub nut, compensating sprocket bolt, and the starter gear assembly.

06. He was then able to remove the stock chaindrive assembly followed by the inner primary.

07. The pressed-on transmission main shaft also had to be removed. At this point the directions recommended replacing the stock crankshaft seal with a new high-quality double lip seal to help keep the beltdrive assembly free of crankcase oil.

08. Next Kazoo began installing the beltdrive by mocking up the motor plate. The Ultima beltdrive has a slightly longer center-to-center distance between the pulleys than the stock sprocket setup. Therefore the transmission mounting bolts had to be loosened up so the motor plate could be properly installed.

09. Once he had the motor plate properly in place and the trans was sitting square on the frame, Kazoo torqued down the trans mounting bolts. He then tightened the motor plate to the engine and trans utilizing thread locker on the bolts and following the torque specs called out by the directions. The Ultima beltdrive requires the use of an ’89-93-type starter driveshaft, which uses a larger 1/4-20 fastener. So kazoo installed the new starter gear assembly and mocked up the clutch basket assembly and motor pulley.

10. He then mounted up the trans pulley and slipped the belt around it. He then slipped the front of the belt onto the motor pulley and slid the pulley into position.

11. With everything aligned he then made sure the pulley nuts were properly torqued to spec.

12. The beltdrive kit came with high-performance steel and friction plates from Alto Products Corp.

13. Kazoo installed the clutch plates into the clutch basket in an alternating pattern starting with a steel plate and ending with a friction plate.

14. After applying a light coat of anti-seize on the clutch adjusting screw, Kazoo aligned the indicator marks on the pressure plate and clutch hub, then installed the pressure plate. Aligning the marks ensured that the clutch hub studs would be centered in the appropriate pressure plate holes so that the clutch springs could be properly installed and torqued to spec. For high horsepower applications, Midwest offers optional heavy-duty springs.

15. At the front of the beltdrive, Kazoo installed the motor pulley cap and torqued the bolts to spec with threadlocker.

16. The heel guard was then bolted to the motor plate.

17. Lastly Kazoo installed the starter gear cover with the supplied bolts and some threadlocker. In a couple of hours the boring enclosed chain primary was swapped out for a more industrial-looking beltdrive setup. The 2-inch Old School Belt Drive looked great on the bike, and when put to use, it operated smoothly and easily handled the power output.

While the stock, enclosed, chain-driven Harley primary is a reliable setup, when it comes to customizing their bikes, many people prefer to swap out the stock assembly for the more mechanical look of an open, belt-driven primary. Years ago when the wide-tire trend was in full effect, beltdrives were reaching near treadmill-like proportions. While a 5-inch beltdrive might have complemented the look of a wild one-off custom with a 360mm rear tire, it didn’t do much for the ridabilty. In fact, it actually hindered the bike by reducing the lean angle. Thankfully the “gotta go wider” trend has nearly disappeared and tire and open beltdrive sizes have come back to more manageable proportions.

Looking to ditch the stock primary on a ’91 Softail with the mean look of an open beltdrive, we came across the Ultima Old School 2-inch Belt Drive. We liked the Old School Belt Drive because it wasn’t so wide that it would cut into the lean angle of the bike, nor was it so skinny that it wouldn’t fit with the proportions of the rest of the bike. Basically it was just the right size. Distributed by Midwest and offered in either a raw or polished finish, the Old School Belt Drive comes with a 140-tooth, 2-inch Goodyear belt, Alto High Performance clutch plates, 45-tooth engine pulley, 71-tooth trans pulley, and all the necessary hardware. Midwest offers the 2-inch belt drives for ’90-99 Softails (’90-06 coming soon) and ’91-05 Dyna models. For those that want a little more meat on their belt, Midwest offers a 3.35-inch open beltdrive for ’90-06 Softails and ’91-05 Dynas, and the company just recently started offering open beltdrives for ’90-06 Baggers as well. Aside from offering quality components, the beltdrives are rather reasonably priced with MSRPs as low as $995.

We headed over to Freedom Cycles in Anaheim, California, where service tech Kazoo performed the install. HB

Source:
Midwest MC Supply

midwestmc.net | [email protected]

Freedom Cycles
(714) 628-0049 | freedomcyclesoc.com

[email protected]