Road Glide: Plain Jain

Bag-draggin’ kickass fun. And that’s it.

Harley Road Glide

Road Glide: Plain Jane

Bag-draggin’ kickass fun. And that’s it.

Words: Mark Masker, Photography: Not Stock Photography

Harley Road Glide

Road Glide: Plain Jane

One of the highlights for me is the exhaust. It’s on all of my bikes. This set is completely stainless, a one-off that I designed, as are the pegs and boards.

Words: Mark Masker, Photography: Not Stock Photography

Harley Road Glide

Road Glide: Plain Jane

The most obvious alteration he did make that is a bold statement is a 26-inch wheel on a 2001 Road Glide

Words: Mark Masker, Photography: Not Stock Photography

Harley Road Glide

Road Glide: Plain Jane

I didn’t want a bunch of crazy stuff on it. Just a clean, classy bike for me and my wife to ride.

Words: Mark Masker, Photography: Not Stock Photography

Harley Road Glide

Road Glide: Plain Jane

My first show car was kind of my inspiration, with the exact color and chrome wheels being the basis of the bike. I’m not a bike builder and did this for fun and to have a bike to ride.

Words: Mark Masker, Photography: Not Stock Photography

“This bike is my vision of a completely rideable and kickass bike—no big-screen TVs or 20-speaker stereos. Just a plain-Jane, bag-draggin’, kickass bike.” That’s what Sik Pipes’ owner/operator Tyler Foster had to say about his scoot. If decked-out baggers are your thing, this Road Glide probably isn’t for you. Foster didn’t make this machine to impress other people; he created what he wanted to ride. It just so happens that what he likes to ride also happens to be pretty cool to look at.

If you’re not familiar with Tyler’s work, he makes all of his pipes by hand in his small shop. He’s done his share of Sportster-based bikes. Having said that, I was a little surprised to hear his personal ride is a bagger. Seeing as how Tyler makes exhausts for a wide range of applications, I probably shouldn’t have been that shocked. He was kind enough to take a break from bending tubing long enough to answer a few questions about this machine.

HB: So why’d you do it?

TF: To ride the hell out of it! I keep the bike plain Jane. I didn’t want a bunch of crazy stuff on it. Just a clean, classy bike for me and my wife to ride. One of the highlights for me is the exhaust. It’s on all of my bikes. This set is completely stainless, a one-off that I designed, as are the pegs and boards.

HB: Give us the origin story.

TF: I purchased the bike on eBay and had it shipped to the shop. Not having seen it in person until it got here, I slowly started gathering parts with the help of Cameron at Camtech. This bike’s main thing was to be a simple bike that could be ridden a lot. I named her “Plane Jain” because to me she’s nothing crazy and impractical. My first show car was kind of my inspiration, with the exact color and chrome wheels being the basis of the bike. I’m not a bike builder and did this for fun and to have a bike to ride.

I saw on Instagram that John from Not Stock Photography was going to be near our area, and I’ve always wanted him to shoot one of my bikes, so of course I contacted him. When we talked, I had two bikes I wanted shot. I told him about this Road Glide and he said, “Kick it into high gear because we’re going to shoot the Road Glide.”

HB: Define “high gear.”

TF: Well, with the help of my friend Justin Fairchild, we worked nights on end to get it done. The centerstand is a completely manual and clean design by Justin. I’d like to thank my wife, two kids, and my mom for the inspiration, and my friend Justin “Juicy J” Fairchild for all of his help.

Even though Plane Jain isn’t a bells-and-whistles tourer, this isn’t to say Tyler skimped on anything, either. He just didn’t go overboard for the most part. Its 2001 Twin Cam B was punched out to 95 inches for more power but not so much displacement as to require extra maintenance. While its stereo won’t blow out eardrums, the Rockford Fosgate unit Mr. Foster installed is a clear improvement in sound quality for the bike.

The most obvious alteration he did make that is a bold statement is a 26-inch wheel on a 2001 Road Glide. Maybe Plain Jain isn’t nearly as plain as he thinks.