Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Function and Looks

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. First I removed the stock control housings and clipped the wiring down by the risers. You do not want to cut the wiring up by the housings. The clearances for the wiring in this area are minimal.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. The coat hanger trick was used to pull the wiring through the new handlebars.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. I went on to disconnect the brake line and loosen up the clutch cable enough to remove the assembly from the stock handlebars.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. Off came the factory risers. I recommend using your phone or digital camera to take pictures as you disconnect the various components. It makes it much easier to put everything back together.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. The Badland risers gave me the additional bar height I was looking for. The handlebars clamped on nicely, and I was pleased with the new stealthy black look.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. The Jaybrake STK controls were a breeze to install, and they are one of the few upgrades to hand controls that are available for newer Harley-Davidsons. The reason being is that many newer bikes, including my 2012 Dyna, are a CAN-bus wired bike. It is essentially a communications network for vehicles, similar to an office computer network. Most modern vehicles are fitted with two or more CAN-bus backbones, to which all devices (such as ABS, engine management systems, and sensors) are attached. The CAN bus relays digital control signals to all devices, which eliminates the need to have every switch or control hard wired to its corresponding device via expensive wiring looms. Every device is simply attached to the CAN bus and power. The result is less wiring, weight, and more efficiency in vehicle design and build complexity. Therefore, you cannot just trace wires back under your seat and wire any custom controls on. I learned this the hard way. I initially tried to wire a different set of controls that used the old wiring system. The STK controls are designed to work with the stock switch housings, and CAN-bus system makes them a popular upgrade. Just refer to your pictures and put everything back into its original state.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. They are smooth and stylish in design and fit the black anodized style I was going for. For the finishing touches I replaced the big oblong-shaped mirrors with the Jaybrake Ultra Radial Mirrors and accompanied the handlebars with full rubber grips.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. I moved on to replacing the forward controls. The billet black anodized Radial controls were going to give it a much better look and allow the bike to function with precision. Just like the hand controls, this was actually pretty easy to do. It was like putting together a relatively simple puzzle. Everything can only go together one way. Eventually the holes matched up!

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. I took off the stock controls and bolted the Radial controls on the stock mounting points of the bike. No additional drilling is needed. Now that the rear master cylinder is integrated into the control, you need to remove the stock one from the rear of the bike. This allows you to shed some weight and simplify the bike by removing the bar that connected the controls to this. The great thing about the forward controls is that you can adjust them to your body. I have really long legs, so it was great to learn that 2000–present controls extend foot reach 2-3/8 inches forward and 1/2 inch lower compared to stock.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. You will need to purchase new rear brake lines and an electronic brake control. I called up Magnum Shielding. They can customize any lines you need, I gave them the measurements needed and the desired bung angles, and new brake lines were at my front door before I knew it.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. My next step was to replace the front stock calipers with a pair of J-Six Extreme Calipers. The stock Fat Bob comes with four-piston calipers. At a younger age—when I had no money or sense—I rode sportbikes. I got spoiled with their ability to stop on a dime. With the beauty of a Harley comes additional weight, and I wanted to be able to stop my nearly-700-pound ride the same way. Maybe not on a dime, but let’s go with a silver dollar. These are six-piston calipers made from billet aluminum with much larger progressively sized bores. The true progressive bore size means there are three bore sizes on both the front and back. This also allows for optimal heat distribution and pad wear.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. They mount directly on to the stock fork, and the stock brake lines work just fine.

Words and Photos: David Roe

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

Jaybrake hand and foot controls and brake calipers

  1. Now that all the goodies are on, it is time to go on a test ride. Before hitting the road I made the necessary adjustments to the clutch and brake cables and went over all the bolts on the bike to ensure they were torqued down. I noticed right off the bat that the bike shifted gears much smoother. The slop was gone, and you knew when you were in gear. Neutral is much easier to find now! The Burly handlebars extend farther back than stock. Combined with the Badland risers and extended foot controls, I had a much more comfortable riding stance. The calipers made a world of difference. I could probably pull off some endos and get featured in our Super StreetBike stunt title. On a serious note, this is an upgrade that is well worth it. There is no brake fade under high-speed braking. Stopping faster could end up saving you down the road. These upgrades definitely enhance the riding characteristics of your Harley-Davidson, making it safer, user-friendly, and much more stylish.

Words and Photos: David Roe

The Harley-Davidson Fat Bob is an aggressively styled bike. Its fat front tire and low stance give it a pretty tough look. Outside of the initial wheel and exhaust upgrade, my next step was to enhance the functionality and look of the hand and foot controls and brake calipers on my bike. The stock forward controls operate with some “play,” and the fit and finish does not appeal to me. I also wanted to clean up the hand controls and add stopping power to my ride. Jaybrake controls are well known and manufactured in the USA, so I contacted the company to get the project underway.

Ray and Gina recommended their Radial Forward Controls, J-Six Extreme Calipers, and STK Hand Controls. Radial mirrors and full rubber grips were included.

Growing up in a General Motors family out of Detroit, I cannot avoid the gearhead label, and turning some wrenches is just a way of life. My experience is not as heavy on the motorcycle end of things, but I felt I had the know-how to do this project without giving away hundreds of dollars in labor to a shop. Of course I did not have all the proper tools, but I was determined to pull it off on my own. Come on, you’ve never used a pair of long-nose pliers to take off a C-clip? Yes, it flew across the garage. I am going to let you know right off the bat that this isn’t going to be an article with numerous pages of text on white pages going over every single step I took to install these parts. Jaybrake provides you with all the detailed directions you need. The point is to show you the basics along with any hurdles I encountered so you can learn from my mistakes. I am your test mule. And by the end you will know the answer to these two questions: Can you do it all on your own? How did the investment of these parts improve the performance, safety, and overall look of my ride?

I have been going with the contrast cut black anodized theme from the start. I looked to Rick at Badlands for some risers and David over at Burly Brand for the bars. I started with these and the hand controls as my first area to conquer.

Sources:

Jaybrake