How to Install Feuling Cams | Hot Bike

How to Install Feuling Cams

Swapping cams and pipes on a Harley-Davidson Road King

Durability is key on long rides, especially when you own a bagger like this 2000 Harley-Davidson Road King. Feuling’s high-flow oil pump and camplate should help keep this motor cooler on those long, hot runs in the desert. Cycle Doctor in Costa Mesa, California, spent a day walking us through the changeover.

cams and pipes

Road King cam assembly and Bassani pipe swap

Mark Masker

Steps 1 & 2

billet cam plate and cam set

Feuling billet cam plate and Kuryakyn's Wild Things TC-2U performance cam set

Mark Masker

Step 1: Most of what we’re doing focuses on a cam assembly swap to modernize the lower end while upgrading oil flow. This Feuling billet cam plate increases engine oil flow and volume by enlarging critical oil passages and the oil pump reservoirs. It’s blueprinted and matched to the Feuling oil pump to take full advantage of the increased volume from the Feuling oil pump we’ll also be adding to the mix (it only works with their pump). It comes with the bearing retainer plate and hardware.

Step 2: Joining the new plate is Kuryakyn’s Wild Things TC-2U performance cam set. The “U” series cams are designed to upgrade earlier Twin Cams to work with later (’06 and ’07) oil pumps. It’s a bolt-in performance set intended for 88- to 103-inch motors.

Steps 3 & 4

push rods and racing lifts

Feuling push rods and racing lifts

Mark Masker

Step 3: Feuling also supplied us with new .120-inch-thick pushrods. They’re stiffer and more rigid than stock rods for increased stiffness valve-train stability. Made from 7/16-inch chrome-moly steel tube, the Feuling pushrods use a minimal adjustment parameter eliminating the flex and loss of valve-train stability problems associated with some adjustable pushrods. They’re also meant for use with performance engines that use larger lift camshafts and high spring pressures while maintaining proper and critical oil flow to valves, springs, rockers, shafts, and valve guides. They can be used with hydraulic or solid lifters.

Step 4: Since we were using Feuling rods, we thought we’d give their standard size racing lifters a try. Like the rods, they’re intended for use with large lift camshafts and higher spring pressures. These lifters are designed to work in conjunction with the Feuling oil pumps or other high-volume oil pump.

Steps 5 & 6

oil pump and exhaust

Feuling's oil pump for twin cam engines and Bassani's Road Rage 2-into-1 exhaust system

Mark Masker

Step 5: Feuling’s oil pump for Twin Cam engines (part #7060, $425) is a Billet 6061 aluminum high-volume unit that increases oil pressure 20 percent for cooler oil and engine temperatures and eliminates blowby and wet sumping due to its 30-percent more scavenge (return) volume.

Step 6: Our last addition is Bassani’s Road Rage 2-into-1 exhaust system.

Steps 7 & 8

pipes and cam cover

Removing pipes and opening cam cover

Mark Masker

Step 7: Jeremiah Fejeran got the King up on the lift then took off both right-side floorboards in order to access the pipes and lower end. He then removed the pipes.

Step 8: Next he pulled the cam cover and drained the compartment. Pre-’01 Twin Cams have a sensor wire that you have to watch out for at this stage; he secured it off to the side so it wouldn’t be in the way.

Steps 9 & 10

Tension relief

Tension relief

Mark Masker

Step 9: You can’t remove the camplate while there’s tension on the chain, so he put in a retaining ring to relieve it.

Step 10: The compartment was still seeping oil, so while we waited for it to finish draining Jeremiah went to the pushrods. He popped the pushrod covers with a screwdriver and used rubber bands with paper clips to hold the covers open so he could remove Brad’s adjustable rods. He then dropped the bike into fifth gear and rolled the motor over to relieve tension on the rods. This gets the lifters to their lowest point so we can hand turn the rods for easy removal.

Steps 11 & 12

Gasket, drive, and pinion removal

Gasket, drive, and pinion removal

Mark Masker

Step 11: After removing the gas tank and rockers to install the new rods, the lifter covers came off. Jeremiah used a razor blade to cut away the old lifter gasket material then took out the lifter alignment pins and old lifters.

Step 12: By this time the cam compartment had drained, so he then removed drive and pinion gears followed by the cam plate and oil pump. He also cleaned out the compartment.

Steps 13 & 14

oil pump and cam assembly

oil pump and cam assembly

Mark Masker

Step 13: We used the included engine lube on the oil pump gears then put them back into the housing. After that the oil pump adapter went on over the crankcase return hole. The flats on the oil pump gear align to those on the crankshaft.

Step 14: Cam assembly is all about the timing. You must make sure all timing marks line up or you’ll destroy the motor. Jeremiah set the timing holes on the cams then pressed the cams in and checked the timing marks on the outside of the plate.

Steps 15 & 16

Hydraulic tensioner and cam bearings

Hydraulic tensioner and cam bearings

Mark Masker

Step 15: Next the new hydraulic tensioner went on. The old one was a spring tensioner; the hydraulic is a lot more durable.

Step 16: We also added new cam bearings since the old ones were seated to fit the previous cams. Here, Jeremiah pops the old ones using a bearing remover and support plate. As he tightens down the remover, the bearings pop themselves out.

Steps 17 & 18

Lubricant and comparison

Lubricant and comparison

Mark Masker

Step 17: Assembly lube on the new bearings and they’re pressed in; threadlocker goes on the cam plate bolts; then the spacer retaining ring goes onto the plate for installation on the bike.

Step 18: When you look at the old (left) and new (right) camplates the differences are night and day. The stock plate is a cast piece, while the Feuling is CNC-machined 7075 billet aluminum for a very precise fit. It’s quieter and 100 percent better in terms of strength and rigidity versus our old cast plate.

Steps 19 & 20

Tightening bolts and aligning sprockets

Tightening bolts and aligning sprockets

Mark Masker

Step 19: We aligned the plate to the crankshaft: Jeremiah turned the rear wheel while tightening to the cam plate bolts to 10 inch-pounds, followed by a final torque down to 12 pound-feet. After he double-checks the torque, he repeats this process for the oil pump bolts.

Step 20: Everything fit together pretty well so far, but we had to shim out the gears to align the sprockets to be flush with the end of the camshaft. Jeremiah then slid both sprockets and the chain on (with the timing marks matched), followed by torquing the big sprocket to 30 pound-feet and 25 pound-feet for the small one. After that he bolted up the hydraulic tensioner and removed the retaining pin.

Steps 21 & 22

Replace gaskets and and rods and lifters

Replace gaskets and and rods and lifters

Mark Masker

Step 21: We were almost done with the cam assembly. Jeremiah scraped the old gasket material off of the inside of the cam cover, replaced it, and bolted the cover back on using the pattern from the manual.

Step 22: At this point it was back to the rods and lifters. He slid the lifters in then laid down new gaskets and reinstalled the covers. After that the rods were slid home inside the covers then Jeremiah reassembled the top end and put the gas tank back in place. Once we bolted on the Bassani exhaust, it was a done deal.

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