Harley-Davidson Shovelhead Turned Café Racer

Part Shovelhead, part Dyna, part Hayabusa, all fun

This bike started life as a 1982 Harley-Davidson FLT but in 2007 the engine started knocking; the camshaft was out of alignment with the pushrod lifters. That led to a teardown and rebuild, of course. But it also led to an inverted front end because owner Steve Lundquist thought that would look pretty cool: “I am a boiler and electrical inspector who knows something about welding, but in practicality a novice at the start of this project. I needed to get into this, so MIG and TIG welders were purchased and welding skills were perfected to make it happen.”

While he was at it, Steve totally transformed this machine. The only stockery left on it are the two pieces that technically define it as a Shovelhead: the chassis and the engine. Everything else lost its job during the renovation. Turning an old FLT into a sleek café racer with late-model sportbike parts on your own like this is a pretty ambitious undertaking, but with his upgraded skill set, Steve did a terrific job.

Harley-Davidson Shovelhead

Other than the frame, the only remaining stock element is that Shovelhead mill. PolyDyn Performance Coatings treated the cases with a slick outer finish that doesn't inhibit heat loss and seals the inside from leaking. The heads have dual spark plugs, are flow ported, and treated with the same Teflon coating as the cases.

Steve Lundquist

Floating rotors and Tokico brakes

Floating rotors and Tokico brakes tell you this machine’s made for performance.

Steve Lundquist

Harley-Davidson Shovelhead

Seeing it in action, it’s easy to imagine dragging pegs in a deep turn while canyon carving on Steve’s bike.

Steve Lundquist



1982 Harley-Davidson

That’s not exactly the stock cockpit from a 1982 Harley-Davidson.

Steve Lundquist

1982 Harley-Davidson

Steve moved the top shock mounts forward to form an equilateral triangle within the swingarm.

Steve Lundquist

Mirrors

Mirrors were located to the handlebar ends.

Steve Lundquist

teardrop gas tank

The frame's backbone came out and was re-formed to accept a teardrop gas tank.

Steve Lundquist

digital gauge

Let’s take a closer look at that digital gauge.

Steve Lundquist

mounting blocks

Down low, the forward control mounts were removed and replaced with mounting blocks welded in at the mid-mount position for Dyna mids.

Steve Lundquist