Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight FXR, Part 3

Just about wrapped on our M-8 FXR

Last issue, we left off with getting the brand-new Harley-Davidson Milwaukee-Eight engine and transmission into the 1993 FXRP frame. This required a ton of fabrication both from the bike’s builder, Danny Wilson, aka the Motor Witch, and famed fabricator Justin Coleman, of Torch Industries. We then got the bike to supreme roller status by installing the Race Tech suspension, Jade Affiliated wheels, Continental tires, and Beringer brakes. This is the part of any ground-up bike build when it looks like it is all really coming together, but actually the hard work had just begun.

Danny had his work cut out for him since the inception of this project. Now he was attempting to put a whole lot of modern wiring, computers, and controllers from a 2018 H-D bagger into a 25-year-old carbureted FXR frame. Danny’s first order of business was to team up with Justin again and deal with installing a fuel pump into the FXR tank to feed the H-D fuel injection system conversion. A donor tank was swiped off a crashed 2016 H-D Iron 883 Sportster. Justin hacked the Sportster’s peanut tank apart, then made a template and installed the fuel pump and pump mount plate into the FXR tank. Sounds pretty easy, right? Well it’s not. The FXR tank, after being welded, had to be pressure tested, then welded again, and then re-coated inside to protect the metal from the ethanol-rich gasoline we now have to deal with in most parts of the United States.

After the tank was done, Danny started the basics of wiring the bike. Once he figured out where he was going to hide most of the black boxes that control the new CAN-bus-based system, he began hanging the other parts on the bike. Up front, the bike used a set of Hard Case Performance risers and gauge mounts, a pair of Lucky Daves Riser handlebars, Speed Merchant grips, and a set of 2018 H-D hand controls with throttle-by-wire. A set of reworked FXRP floorboards and foot controls were installed, and a custom-stitched Saddlemen seat was made to work with the stock H-D FXR rear fender and tank. Out back, a set of FXR Division police bags will be installed, along with some lighting components from Custom Dynamics.

The final piece of the puzzle was getting an exhaust made. We didn’t want any off-the-shelf pipe for this bike. And since the motor was going to be punched out to 151ci soon, thanks to the folks at Leading Edge V-twin, we needed a real-deal multistepped custom 2-into-1 pipe. A phone call was made to Jay at Fab28 Industries, and he loaded up his Transit van with a ton of tubing and headed to Arizona. Once Jay set up shop at FXR Division’s headquarters, he got busy designing and welding up the perfect performance exhaust for what we both wanted and needed for this project.

Once all the wires were run and the brake and clutch hoses were measured, the bike was completely torn apart, piece by piece. The frame and a few other ancillary parts will be headed to visit the powdercoater next, and by the time that gets finished, we should receive the tank, fenders, fairing, and side covers back from Taylor Schultz, of Schultz Designz in Northern California. Taylor has a long history of giving FXRs amazing paint jobs, so when this project began all those months ago, we knew that he was the only man for the job. The parameters that we gave Schultz regarding the paint was that it had to have a black-and-white cop-bike theme, but other than that, anything goes! We can’t wait to get the paint back from Taylor and his crew. We’re pretty sure it will be the perfect blend of both custom and cop, which as you can imagine, is a tough thing to achieve.

Once powdercoat and paint get back to Buddy Stubbs Harley-Davidson, where the bike is being assembled, Danny will move on to final assembly and button everything up. The #M8FXR project is finally nearing completion! Stay tuned.

Mmilwaukee-Eight FXR Build

Milwaukee-Eight FXR Build

Jeff G. Holt

installing a fuel pump in a carbureted tank
  1. The process of installing a fuel pump in a carbureted tank is not an easy one. But Justin Coleman, from Torch Industries, got the job done.

Jeff G. Holt

messy wires in motorcycle
  1. As you can see, the wiring on this bike is sheer madness. Can you say psychedelic spaghetti?

Jeff G. Holt

modified stock FXRP foot controls
  1. The stock FXRP foot controls and floorboards were heavily modified to work with the new engine and driveline.

Jeff G. Holt

Saddlemen stitched up seat
  1. Saddlemen stitched up a seat that combines the look of its Step Up with a cop-bike seat.

Jeff G. Holt

handmade motorcycle pipe
  1. Jay, from Fab 28 Industries, handmade the pipe to both look good and handle horsepower.

Jeff G. Holt

Hard Case Performance risers and gauge mounts
  1. Hard Case Performance risers and gauge mounts were installed on Lucky Daves Riser handlebars. Next up will be Speed Merchant grips, and 2018 H-D hand controls with throttle-by-wire.

Jeff G. Holt

project M8FXR motorcycle
  1. The project M8FXR was being readied for its final buildup and maiden voyage to Sturgis.

Jeff G. Holt

Project Milwaukee-Eight FXR at Sturgis
  1. And this is how the bike looked as it arrived for its Sturgis debut. Stay tuned for the next installment of the #M8FXR in the next issue.

Jeff G. Holt