Guess How Much This Road Glide Special’s Paint Costs

Buddy Stubbs Harley-Davidson creates a road-ripping bagger

Kris Schatzberg

Kris Schatzberg has Buddy Stubbs Harley-Davidson to thank for all the work on his Road Glide.

Shooters Images

Most people’s first Harley-Davidsons aren’t usually V-Rods. That’s just not how it’s done. You get a Sportster, ride it for a while, then upgrade to a full Big Twin, right? Not if you’re already an experienced rider. Or Kris Schatzberg.

At age 16, Kris took it on himself to buy a V-Rod from Buddy Stubbs Harley-Davidson. Having been a Harley fan for as long as he could remember, he skipped the midsize phase for something more powerful. Kris’ father owned and worked on H-Ds all through his son’s childhood; Kris already knew what he was getting into.

Custom Saddle Liners

The liners from Custom Saddlebag Liners are just a little different.

Shooters Images

Road Glide

Stereo yes, cupholder no. The Road Glide’s set up for a rider, not a driver.

Shooter Images

The Road Glide Special you’re seeing now is his sixth Harley-Davidson. None of Kris Schatzberg’s iron horses stay stock for long. “I went to grade school with Jack and Frank Stubbs and have purchase all my Harleys from Buddy Stubbs H-D,” Kris says. “Back when I found out the new Road Glide was coming out, I had to have one. I bought it off the showroom floor.”

Screamin’ Eagle

Flat black on the Screamin’ Eagle 120-cubic-incher balances some of that pricey white paint.

Shooter Images

Road Glide

Kris’ Road Glide wasn’t cheap, but the end result is a sweet-looking custom bagger that isn’t outrageous or over-the-top.

Shooter Images

He didn’t mince words about the inspiration behind his ensuing redesign, to boot: “ At Arizona Bike Week, I was riding my Triumph Scrambler and was jealous of all the baggers around but didn’t want a ‘big-wheel clown bike.’ So I built a realistic, clean-looking, rideable, tire-shredding machine that bikers can appreciate.”

Paul Yaffe’s Monkey Bars

Harley-Davidson hand controls cap Paul Yaffe’s Monkey Bars.

Shooter Images

Saddlebags

Kris kept the saddlebags in the stock dimensions. He likes to get himself some lean-in twist. We all know extended bags and fenders don’t do too well at deep angle.

Shooter Images

The most challenging part of the build was unlocking the ECM to convert the up/down switches for the air ride suspension. Kris used a Screamin’ Eagle dash that has the power lock/unlock buttons on it and converted them to control the air ride up/down instead.

Fender

Although the bike kept the stock back fender, it’s cleaner now. At $2K a gallon for paint, you’d de-clutter yours too!

Shooter Images

SMT front hoop

The 21-inch SMT front hoop is definitely not of the big-wheel persuasion.

Shooter Images

LED turn signals

Up close with the shark-nose fairing with LED turn signals.

Shooter Images

One of the most interesting aspects of this bike is the paint though: “At first I was going to paint the bike orange but at the last minute I had seen a Lamborghini in Bianco Canopus paint; it is a Matte White Metallic and I had to have it. I contacted my friends at Scott’s Coachworks in Phoenix and had them get the paint. When I heard how much a gallon of the paint cost, I didn’t believe it—$2,000 a gallon! But it turned out just how I wanted.”