Custom Exhaust: Motorvatin’

DIY exhaust mating with Biltwell and Leo Vince

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Biltwell's kit and our new pipe.

Words and Photos Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. We really liked the looks of this Leo Vince muffler and its segmented stainless steel design, so with the help of the Leo Vince staff we ordered one with the profile we needed.

Words and Photos Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. We have been using this DIY exhaust kit from Biltwell for years, and they have never failed us. In fact, one kit usually has enough material for two bikes’ worth of piping.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. We hacked the correct flared ends from the Biltwell kit and had to steal some exhaust flanges and retaining rings from the stock pipes to start the build.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. We installed the flared tubing and the flange into the front exhaust port of the bike and snugged it up.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. From one of the 90-degree segments in the pipe kit, we cut as close to the proper bend as we could and then had to grind and cut it until we had the correct bend.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. We found that in order to have the exhaust as high up and tight to the motor as we wanted it, a straight pipe was going to hit the bottom of the S&S carb. We had to improvise.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Using three segments that were fashioned into a slight “S” pattern, we made sure the exhaust had plenty of clearance between the carb and bottom end of the motor.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Once we had all of the angles correct, Dave tacked them all into place with his TIG welder.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Next was the segment of the 2-into-1 pipe from the front exhaust port to the rear. It is slightly curved at the front to correctly meet the “S” portion of the tubing.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Once we had the proper length and bend, Dave also tacked this section into place.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Due to the muffler of the exhaust being so high, we are using the ever-stable upper shock mount to attach it to the bike.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. We quickly made a mount out of two nuts and a piece of tubing. This will be replaced with something better looking later.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. With the muffler hung and the head pipe being tacked together, we needed to span the gap and get the rear exhaust port hooked into the system as well.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. After cutting some straight tubing to the proper length, Dave tacked it into place.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Knowing that we were going to have some major cutting and welding to fab up the rear portion of the pipe, Dave finish welded the majority of the head pipe so it would be secure.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Once the head pipe was reinstalled on the bike, we got busy fabbing up the rear part of the 2-into-1 exhaust by eyeballing the tubing angle first.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. As with the front exhaust port, we used a small section of the Biltwell kit and snugged it onto the motor.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. Taking a slightly curved portion of tubing, we marked where it would intersect the head pipe.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. After a bit of cutting and grinding, we got the correct shape of the tubing.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. The pipe was yet again pulled off the bike and a hole was cut into the tubing for the rear exhaust to escape from.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. The pipe was put back on the bike, and the rear part of the head pipe was then finish welded.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

harley pipe diy

Motorvatin'

  1. We then installed the muffler, tightened everything down to factory specifications, and we were done. Yes, this high and tight pipe is funky and one of a kind, but it fits this bike perfectly.

Words and Photos: Jeff Leighton

Sometimes the need for custom parts necessitates the requirement to not only modify existing parts but to build them completely from scratch. Such is the case of this moto-esque sporty we have been working on the past few months. We didn’t want a low-slung pipe or something we had seen before, so we decided to build one. Our only directive was that we wanted something high and tight so it would never have a chance of scraping the tarmac no matter how hard we had it laid over. Seeing no system like we wanted available, we snatched up a Biltwell pipe kit and a killer Leo Vince Yamaha R6 pipe and took them to our buddy Dave Singrey at Davey’s Welding. In a few short hours, he hacked, ground, and welded the muffler and tubing until the two were mated in unholy matrimony.

Sources:

Biltwell

Davey’s Welding (562) 243-8808

Leo Vince